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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
the government has certain basic responsibilities like guaranteeing civil rights. searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. choosing dialogue over blame, respect over division, hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity but his son, envision. he saw connections others didn't see what the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term he gave his search -- first speech on vietnam. in 1970 he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984 he urged our american leadership to understand the complexity that challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that doesn't mean his campaign
during the missile crisis, but in everything he does, whether it's vietnam policy, tax policy, civil rights, constantly thinking about how will this play out and how is this going to look? i would very carefully draw the distinction between that and partisan politics in a superficial sense. i do not believe he was partisan in the superficial sense that we like to talk about that was a political decision and things like that, and a lot of the time -- we mean that superficially as a partisan way, but in a much deeper way, i think he was absolutely aware of the political ramifications, but it just wasn't -- he was careful, for instance, to brief dwight eisenhower, at that point, one the leading republican figures, gave him special briefings in the crisis, called him on the tfn, we have those recordings. he sent the cia director, director of central intelligence, john mccohen, tight in republican party politics at this point, sent him to brief eisenhower. whenever there were -- he was briefing congressional leaders, it was a bipartisan affair, not getting democratic leaders on the phone
in the missile crisis that everything he does with its the it non-policy, civil rights, he's constantly thinking about how is this going to play out? but i would draw the distinction between that and partisan politics in a superficial sense. i argue in the book they do not believe that he was partisan and the super said delete a superficial sense we dhaka that there was a political decision and things like that and a lot of the time we mean that very superficially but in a deeper way i think that he was absolutely aware of the ramifications but he was very careful for instance to brief the white eisenhower who at the plant was one of the leading republican takers and he gave him special briefings during the crisis and called him up on the telephone. he was sending john mccallum, the cia director of the center of intelligence come he would send john, who was very tight in the republican politics at this point, she would send him to advise. whenever there were -- he was reading the congressional leaders a was a bipartisan. he wasn't getting the democratic leaders on the phones giving them privileg
, notably some of the nominations to the supreme court, and the soft attitude on civil rights to woo southern support." "the des moines register" endorsed nixon after, after the watergate burglary which occurred on june 17th of that election year. in june of the election year, the democratic party headquarters in washington was broken into in the middle of the night and instantly the entire world suspected richard nixon. in september of the election year, seven co-conspirators were indicted in the burglary including two men with strong ties to republican world. watergate got one line. one line in "the des moines register's" presidential endorsement in 1972. "we are disturbed by the watergate scandal and the evidence linking it with the white house." they were disturbed but not disturbed enough not to endorse richard milhous nixon. there wasn't a kid in my high school who didn't know that tricky dick was a crook, but "the des moines register" editorial board didn't know that. >> i'm not a crook. >> 19 days before "the des moines register" endorsed that crook, bob woodward and carl ber
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
for one minute rebuttal. markell: psychiatry arne duncan says and i agree that education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware and closing the chief of the gatt which we keep a close eye on. the achievement gap we want to raise the achieve of all students, and that is exactly what we are doing. i am more excited about what is going on in public schools in delaware today than i've ever been. my wife and i. she went all the way through the schools right here in newark, but i'm more excited today. we came in first place in two and half years ago on race to the top. it's one thing to win a competition and now we are implementing it and making progress. we just announced two months ago that it ended in june 2000 market for proficient in reading and 9,000 more proficient enough in the year before. i want you to speak to the racial difference. we know that achievement gap. i thought you were asking about all the folks >> moderator: the only significant investment we are making we have a lot of african-american kids as our significant commitment to early chi
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
of the series with the civil rights history in america. that was kind of a fundamental place from each of them also worked on a documentary series deal the following country but i learned by working in production and then bike immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to that best practices thing that happens in institutions. where you're not just struggling to make the thing, you're actually talking about and you also have community and resources. i think if you can afford it, i think that it's certainly a powerful river i just happened to have learned the hard as we possible can which is used by working in production, not doing anything else. >> is the issue here the kind of method, the institutions and the sort of patterns of careers that allows people to train to the sort of watchdog type stuff, whether they were exactly journalists or did someone thinks? are those drawing up? i mean -- >> i mean, documentary film is interesting because in some ways i think that's a really exist at a british ship model is part of how you become a film maker. but i think in jour
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
said at the beginning is right which is books are civilization. and i'm much more worried about sglifl civilization's survival than an industry's survival. so maintaining and spreading these all important, i think, habits of these conversation, thee intimate conversations is worries me more than what will happen to my books or to the publishers. >> one of the issues with printing is that there really is a step function in the cost of printing. you know. you print smaller quantities. it becomes more expensive. now it's certainly true that you can go print on demand. for example 80% of my company's books are now print on demand. even when we are printing 10,000 copies. you know, we're working with ingram and have done a fantastic job of building an infrastructure that let us us do whatever quantity we want. and it's integrated with a digital tool chain that allows us literally to publish a book to an ebook in five or six different formats. push it out into a digital tool. so digital distribution chain, you know, immediately so we have this new kind of logistics of book publishing which i
protect you and me from those who would do us harm, threaten our rights and take away our civil liberties whether they be foreign or domestic, unscrupulous businesses, corporations or individuals. i gained a reputation as a legislator committed to working together. i worked with governor mike leavitt to balance the state budget every single year. collaboration is how problems are solved. as your united states senator, i promise you every day i'll work the represent you -- to represent you and this great state. god bless you. god bless utah, and thank you very much. >> moderator: on behalf of the studio audience, our viewing audience and the citizens of utah, we thank you both for running. [applause] >> that debate between candidates to represent utah in the u.s. senate happened on october 17th. it's one of the dozens of debates we've been bringing you this election season. follow campaign 2012 live on the c-span television networks, c-span radio and c-span.org. you can also find us on twitter and facebook, and we've also been taking a look at some of the swing states in play this election
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and four example would continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond as you see what's going on in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders. that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense. we provide statistical support to all geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key rotary for aviation, information operations, civil affairs, military police come into view defense capabilities. corps of engineers were pretty busy today doing other things. we've critical components of the military space program. for example, were responsible for everything from the satellite to the ground station prevented communication based on elements. a lot of people don
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
. we can't forget about that. we are responsive and we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provided a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders and that includes intelligence, surveillance recognizance for off the geographical combatant commanders. would provide air and missile defense. geographical combatant commanders provide logistical support for all geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key -- for aviation and information operations civil affairs military police wmd defense capabilities, corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components and military space program. for example we are responsible for everything from the satellite
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects of the personalities to which you were privy, in particular in your case lbj and some of the dynamics and contradictions in lbj is personality as reflected by the many voices that you have included in this book. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwr
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)